Seasons of Change

Just one more day and fall is here. Where we live we can tell when the season is changing by the changes in our local traffic. Also the upper edges of the bluffs in our area start to show their fall colors and the produce at the market changes from tender sweet fruit and vegetables to the kind better stored in root cellars and processed into canning jars. While there are still green beans at Farmer’s Markets, they’re not as tender as they were in June. Our last haul included half a dozen acorn squash and several zucchini with the last of summers cucumbers. This growing season marks the second year of our seasonal only eating. What does seasonal eating mean?

Seasonal eating means purchasing and eating food around the time the food was harvested. Which for us means, we eat asparagus in the spring and then will not eat it again until next spring. Same for tomatoes, rhubarb, strawberries, raspberries, and sweet corn. I have processed and frozen green beans, zucchini, beets, and squash to eat this winter. The reason we do this is two-fold: for one we want to eat food that is freshly harvested and preferably very local to us (grown within 50-60 miles of us), secondly we find this is a wonderful way to support our local farmers. Essentially they grow it and we are there come harvest to buy it and eat it. And we buy a lot of it. We eat as much sweet corn as we can handle. This year that mean approximately 100 ears were eaten by two people in this household. I ate over 11 pints of strawberries (each time picked fresh that morning) and about the same amount in raspberries plus I had 35 ripe peaches and 15 ripened pears. Together my husband and I ate 5 bunches of asparagus, 10 bunches of fresh carrots, 2.5# of green beans, 15# new potatoes, 10# of fingerlings,10# of fresh beets, 12 bunches of fresh spinach, 12 bunches of fresh lettuce, lost count on the cucumbers, and 20 peppers of various color. I alone have eaten 50 tomatoes since July. Now as the season changes we’ve begun consuming apples, squash, and zucchini.

All total from the first week of June until the first week of September we spent approximately $25.00 a week (roughly $350.00) on local produce in two different Farmer’s Markets. Prices are never lower for produce then when they are being harvested. During the summer months our meals consist of lots of fruits and vegetables and very little meat (1 maybe 2 meals a week with meat), and almost no unhealthy snacking. So we save a lot of money throughout the summer.

Prior to eating seasonally we would purchase substandard tasteless produce that was not local to us all winter long. Now–we store some of summers bounty up for winter eating and then come fall we’re buying squash, apples, and zucchini that we will also enjoy all winter. Through out the winter months we will not buy any produce in the store except lettuce and bananas. No matter how bad I might want a tomato in my winter salad, I will not buy any tasteless ones out of season.

Pictured is our favorite tree on the south shore of Devil’s Lake right behind the snack shack. One or the other of us has been photographing this tree since 2005.

Like the seasons of growing and harvesting food each one of us is in a season of our life. I am currently in mid- fall where a lot of my foliage has changed color and some of it may now be lying on the forest floor. There are still bits of rare green here and there but for the most part fall has been declared.

I hope I’ve given you something to think about and that perhaps you and your family might consider seasonal eating. Thank you for stopping. Below are two informative sites that discuss seasonal eating, why it’s better for you and your local community, and lastly how eating seasonally can save you a lot of $.

Eating Seasonally Food Guide

Why eating seasonally is better !

 

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The Beginner’s KetoDiet Cookbook by Martina Šlajerová– a book review

I would venture a guess that everyone on Planet Earth has heard about the Keto diet. I follow at least 50 people who have tried it this year. Often to me anyway, the diet seems complicated and in the back of my mind, I’ve always got several questions about what it all means, and how successful any one of them have been on it.

Until I reviewed The Beginner’s KetoDiet Cookbook by Martina Šlajerová. Here is the review I recently posted–

The Beginner’s KetoDiet Cookbook is an informational cookbook that thoroughly explains the science behind the Keto diet and with that offers easy to follow recipes, with easy to understand instructions, and fairly easy to obtain ingredients. I enjoyed the informative parts early on in the book and loved the easy to understand charts. I would describe this book as being one of the most user-friendly cookbooks out there for those interested in trying the Keto diet. I tried several of the recipes with my favorite chapter being soups and salads. I also loved the garlic and herb focaccia and brie egg muffins. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is planning to try the Keto diet. In The Beginner’s KetoDiet Cookbook you will find food swaps, substitutes, carb counters, instructional information, a Keto staple grocery list, tips for success, recipes and so much more.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher Fair Winds Press for giving me the opportunity to review The Beginner’s KetoDiet Cookbook by Martina Šlajerová.

10 Book ReviewsReviews PublishedProfessional Reader

The Month of September means–

Baking several loaves of banana bread (and freezing them), visiting the apple orchard for the first time and trying Paula Reds, and surprises like my new guinea impatiens blooming again. This pretty sherbet colored impatiens has been blooming off and on all season. It has outperformed EVERYTHING I planted this year. In the last 8 days, we’ve had between 20-30 inches of rain (depending on where you are located in this county). Everything is wet, saturated, and in most cases ruined. Luckily because of where we are located– second-floor apartment on a hill, we were not flooded. Summer is almost gone and then we will settle into fall with more apple picking and squash baking and then eventually await the spring seed catalogs. Where does time go? It’s lost somewhere between intent and actual doing–never to be held, never to slow down, never to be captured. Always lost.

Eat like your grandparents did!

ourgrandparents

I was inspired to write this blog post mainly because this week I’ve witnessed dozens of epiphanies from people who’ve been dieting since January. Obviously, we all know several people who jump on the dieting bandwagon the first month of the new year. What some of us may not have known — is that it would seem come the new school year many of these same people begin questioning their diets. If I saw one, I must have seen a dozen people come to the following revelation >>> They’ve decided to try eating in moderation because some book told them to. So add moderation as a trend to the trendy diets for the people we know who are on diets 11 months out of the year.

I’m really not trying to be snarky about any of this. Dieting is serious stuff. Dieting, constant dieting and changes in your body, can and will do serious damage. Dieting is always temporary. Temporary until the dieter falls off the wagon temporarily, temporary until the next trend comes along, or temporary until the dieter quits for good. Quick weight loss plans are quick temporary diets. Unfortunately, the damage dieting can do may not be as temporary as the diet itself.

The plain fact of the matter is dieting leads to disaster–every single time. This is a fact that is backed up by doctors, therapists, dieters, and healthcare practitioners. Nowadays there are diets that eliminate food, bread, dairy, meat, grain, plants, supplements, air, etc. You get my drift. I know at least one person on each one of these “diets” and some that are on a different diet train month after month after month. Hey, do what’s best for you but know this– it’s been proven that trendy diets do more harm than good. It’s clear to see that naming which diet, diet plan, or supplemental drink you’re on via social media is trendy, but in the long-term none of it will do your body good.

Slowly but surely most people come around to the idea that if they eat in moderation, eat whole foods, and exercise they will lose weight and improve their health. Diet gurus, MLM’s, influencers, and bloggers have really done a number on people. I see people all the time throwing out big boxes of meal plans, diet books, shakes, supplements, kits, and so on. Hundreds and hundreds of dollars of stuff. Yes, they lost a couple of pounds, maybe even 20 or 30 pounds, but they starved something somewhere in their body to do it. It’s a fact that once they stop whatever they are doing they will put the pounds back on and probably continue to keep putting them on. Which will reaffirm to them they should be dieting or that said diet was working.

It’s your mind that you have to put on a diet, not your body. You need to learn about nutrition, food, and what each thing that you put into your mouth does or doesn’t do for you. You need to learn about portion size, about eating whole foods and what whole foods are, and how to buy, store, and prepare nutritious foods.

Fifty years ago common sense informed people that eating in moderation was the only way to diet. In the last thirty or so years people have written most common sense off as old wives tales(apparently) and instead have spent millions of dollars trying the latest fad. And now? The latest fad is to eat in moderation. Go figure.

It’s also sad that people have to buy dozens and dozens of books to teach or reteach themselves how to feed their bodies. Has society really and truly strayed that far away from the obvious answers?

If you need to buy books then at least buy books by licensed nutritionists and registered dieticians. Your family doctor is great for everything health related to your specific health needs, but if he’s like mine will be the first to tell you he didn’t study nutrition in med school. Again–I repeat, when it comes to nutrition seek out licensed nutritionists and registered dieticians. That means you don’t look for or take advice online from— commission based sales representatives, MLM distributors, motivational speakers, or doctors, med school students, or armchair doctors before consulting your physician.

Take what you can from any information you find whether online or at the doctor’s office–whatever directly and safely pertains to you. In every “fad” or “trendy” diet there is some good. For instance you will learn about portion size, or exercise, or how to cut out bad carbs, or to drink more water, and eat a variety of different fruits, veggies, and foods. All this is good information until the fad or trend tells you to stop doing this or stop doing that (which has nothing to do with moderation). Moderation works! Consult your physician so that he or she can give you the full picture on your health and then ask to speak with a licensed nutritionist or registered dietician before trying any of the popular diet fads or trends discussed online 24/7.

Though I may not have ever gone on a “diet” I have spent the last twenty years on a 1600 calorie a day meal plan.  This isn’t a fad or trend diet meal plan, but one that is set up for my age, weight, and health concerns. I limit sugar, I don’t drink anything with caffeine, and I keep my carbs at 800 calories of carbs a day. I walk briskly 3 x a week, and stretch and do yoga 3x a week. Every day I eat 3 fruits and try to eat 3-4 veggies. I don’t eat processed food. I do eat bread. I do eat meat approx. 3-4 times a month. I drink half my body weight in water every day. I’m by no means perfect and I haven’t always eaten this way.

Full disclosure– thanks to genetics I have the potential to balloon up to 250-300#– maybe more. I have many things in common with my paternal grandmother; including her body shape (pear) and ability to pack on the pounds.  I have never ever been on a diet. I am not skinny. I weigh 35# more than I should, but it’s not due to eating unhealthy. In fact, 99% of it is due to not being able to be as active as I need to be due to a back issue. I’ve been eating whole foods in moderation for over a decade and have never weighed more than 168#. I deal with arthritis in my feet and Fibromyalgia issues daily which also limit my ability to walk, hike, and ride a bike as much as I’d like to. I get a lot of advice on what foods and drinks to avoid based on my issues. Time and again I hear–don’t eat dairy. First, I am not allergic to dairy nor am I lactose intolerant. It is my strongest desire with the issues I deal with to have good strong bones. I drink 12 oz of organic milk every day. I also eat 2-3 slices of organic cheese a week, and during the summer months enjoy the heck out of a good ice cream cone 1-2 times a month. I experience zero inflammation from dairy. There is a link between lactose intolerance/milk allergy and inflammation–I found a great article on this which is below:

Inflammation and  dairy

Metabolism Basics

Why Dieting is Harmful by a Fitness Expert

Five Reasons Not to Diet in 2018

Diets Don’t Work–so why do we keep trying them?

If you take anything away from what I’ve just written I hope it is that I am very concerned about all this trendy dieting. I totally understand people want and need to lose weight. I totally understand all the emotions connected with people and their weight/body image, and health. I worked in healthcare for twenty years starting as a certified nursing assistant and retiring in healthcare management. I worked with certified nutritionists and registered dieticians all the time developing meal plans for clients throughout the twenty years I worked in healthcare. These are the people to go to, consult with, and work with for weight loss and better health.

I think there are a lot of well-intentioned people on the internet that try something and enjoy good results and then want to pass that information along to others. Whether by selling others shakes or powders or supplements. I certainly don’t begrudge them trying to help people, while also trying to support their family with extra income.

That said– it is wise to consult your physician, naturopath,  or nurse practitioner before trying any new diet or supplement being sold or shared online. As I stated before your doctor may not be able to advise you on nutrition based on what he/she learned in med school, but they will be able to tell you whether a new diet or supplement is a good idea based on your health, current meds, and any information they can glean about said new diet or supplement.

Until next time–give whole foods and some of these nutrition books a try–(Amazon links, but not affiliate links)

Basic Nutrition

Good Calories Bad Controversial Science

The Rodale Whole Foods Cookbook-1000 recipes for choosing, cooking, and preserving whole foods.

2018 Container Gardening–Week 12

Finally a sunny day for picture taking–everything is doing fabulous! Gardening is amazing therapy. It keeps you on your toes no matter how big or small your garden is. And the rewards–everyday there is a reward. This year is the first year I kept not one but two new guinea impatiens alive and surprise surprise a fuschia. This year’s trick was keeping them in their original containers and NOT transplanting them into one of mine. My container garden started as a few 6 inch plants or seedlings and here it is at week 12–









Planning a Potager

You may be asking yourself when you read the title of this blog–what is a potager? Potager is french for kitchen garden. When I plant my garden I always include herbs and pretty flowers. In a sense that is the concept behind a potager. A kitchen garden is usually right outside your kitchen door where you can easily access it to pick flowers or vegetables. Your kitchen garden should contain, at the very least, ingredients from which you can put together a pot of soup or stew.  This link will teach you how to properly say potager. It took me a couple of tries but I finally pronounce it correctly. This year my potager, which will actually be grown in containers on my porch, will contain red geraniums on the outer edges,  a potato plant, 5 tomato plants (different heirloom varieties), a pepper plant,  beet root, nasturtiums, borage, lavender, rosemary, thyme, and lemon balm. I have one decorative pot I will be planting with a lime green leaf coleus and three dahlia plants.  Among all of my plants I plant companion plants like sugar snap peas, chives, and mint this year. I am going to try cucumbers and mini pumpkins as late crops in containers once one of my tomato plants or the pepper plant is done producing–I’ve never had luck growing mini pumpkins so fingers crossed this year. On my deck I can only have so much weight, and my space is limited to 10′ x 5′ so as soon as one plant is done producing another plant will take its place in a pot. All of my plants are bought from Bauer’s Market Place in La Crescent, Minnesota. I’ve tried a lot of other places throughout the years, and even though Bauer’s is over an hours drive from home–it’s worth the trip. The prices and quality of their plants cannot be beat.

The soil I will be using is Purple Cow Organic soil along with their bio-active fertilizer. I had such a wonderful container garden  last year thanks to their gardener’s product line.


It’s hard to believe that this is what it looked like 9 days ago here!

Here’s a gardening tip that has proven invaluable to me as a tomato lover and tomato plant grower- never ever let the leaves of your tomato plant get wet. I trim off all bottom leaves –the little suckers and leaves that grow on bottom. These leaves when wet can rot the plant and can deliver a fungus to your plant and cause blight. Also–never ever water tomato or potato plants from above. Always stick the hose or watering can by base of plant to water. Cucumbers and melons also don’t like to be watered from above, their leaves will develop a fungus on them that is a white powdery substance. To produce tomatoes keep the soil warm, and to produce potatoes keep the soil cool.

A reader prompted me to look into more information regarding bottom watering–because as we know Mother Nature doesn’t water from the bottom. I also pondered this when I began to water from the bottom. Garden documentary after garden doc I saw bottom watering, drip watering, and self-watering. Most urged gardeners not to get the plant or fruit wet before the sun hit because the water can then burn your plant and fruit. Why Mother Nature can water your plant and fruit and not cause burn? That may forever remain a mystery, but, if you water at dusk or dawn no worries. Watering and then letting the sun hit=worries. Many gardeners deal with blight. Just two years ago I was the only one among many gardeners in my area not hit with blight. Some asked me what I did different. I never let my leaves or fruit get wet, I watered from the bottom, and I pinched off all the suckers on my plant including the ones at the base. My tomato plants have nice clean stalks up to the main branches, and I use soil that drains well, and I cover the soil with an environmentally safe weed barrier (that helps to keep my soil warm). Here are two sources I gleaned information from regarding bottom watering.

Houzz

Dengarden

Happy Earth Day

This year my container garden is going to be dedicated to herbs and tomatoes. On earth day I went to our local nursery and purchased my tomato plants. Because our apartment does not have much sunlight coming in I am forced to buy mature tomato plants for my garden. I am growing other things from seed– nasturtiums, zinnia’s, cat grass, sweet peas, and lettuce. The snow is officially gone here–10 inches has melted in less than a week. So, this week is planning and buying and soon..putting it all together. Happy Earth Day!!

Happy Anniversary Finn!

A decade of blogging about good food! #livinghealthy #healthylifestyle #goodfood

Where do I start? Just the other day I was discussing how many years I’d been blogging–18 years to be exact. My first blog was on LiveJournal and I blogged about my daily life. My posts were like something you would share in your personal diary, only not as personal. I suffered greatly with trying to regularly update my journal, and also to join other community’s to share my journal. After about eighteen or so months I gave it up..

I can’t remember if it was Blogger or WordPress that I joined next but I began blogging again about selling on eBay and living in the Midwest in 2004. In 2006 I started this blog, but didn’t make public any of my posts. I blogged about health, and food, and life changes. In 2008 I began to make public some of those posts and I’ve been blogging here ever since.  Along the way I’ve been asked maybe fifty times what initially inspired me to write about food, food safety, and lifestyle changes. Because there were always so many answers to that I usually threw out my concerns for my husband and I and our health, my strong desire to live a better life, and the beginning of my journey of a sober and smoke-free lifestyle. All of which is very true to this day. Something that I have failed to share because I hadn’t probably thought of it at the time is the person who started me thinking about living a healthier and happier lifestyle.

That person was and still is Suzanne Somers. I picked up her book called 365 Ways To Change Your Life in 1999 and then in 2003 I bought her book The Sexy Years. I knew who Suzanne Somers was, I’d watched Three’s Company —but I’d never looked at Suzanne Somers being who she portrayed in the television series as who she was in real life. At some point I had watched her give an interview and she really impressed upon me that she was pretty good at leading a healthy life. And let’s be honest she’s fabulous looking–who wouldn’t take a bit of advice from someone as beautiful and obviously healthy as her?  I’d like to insert it here I am so not a self-help book type of gal. Nothing wrong with other people buying them but I would rather try something on my own then follow someone’s advice from a book. However, I have enjoyed and found very helpful several self-help books Suzanne Somers has written.  In 2008 I found a book written by Suzanne  called Breakthrough: Eight Steps to Wellness, and it changed my life. Page by page her words, her thoughts, resonated with me and where I wanted to take my life.

Suzanne became a public voice and in many instances, what I would consider, a pioneer in using health treatments not supported or advised by the medical community. There has been a lot of controversy about things she has done and has gone on record to say. I won’t go into them. It’s not because I don’t support her, because I wholeheartedly do, it’s because things have been said for years about people who take a different route or stance with their healthcare other than the conventional route.  Most of what is said is said to slander the person that is trying something different, or make them out to be reckless or dangerous, or cuckoo. I’ve been there myself. Every time I tell someone I haven’t been sick with a cold or flu since 2004 they look at me like I’m either lying, or living under a rock. For years my husband and I were teased about eating organic food, now he and I both have co-workers asking almost us weekly where we shop, if this is safe, is there organic this or that at the store? A couple of years ago I had a physician ask me to write down my health regime- foods I was eating, antibiotic use, otc drug use, and my health history because she was impressed with how strong my immune system was and also my ability to recover quickly from surgery.

So, with that said I feel pretty blessed to be in such good health considering I didn’t start out life in good health and really lived like a rock star until I was in my thirties. Luckily just in time, and thanks to Suzanne, I was inspired to turn it all around after reading Breakthrough: Eight Steps to Wellness.

In 2008 organic food wasn’t even sold in our local grocery stores. Physician’s were not prescribing clean diets, or healthier lifestyles, or preventative medicines/treatments/tests. I don’t even want to get into how I was treated by the mostly male dominated physicians at the clinic in the town we lived. I’ve been told things like my hormone “troubles” will work themselves out to hot soapy water soak for a severely infected toe that ended up having surgery to remove a nail, which then ended up having surgery at a different hospital to fix podiatrist #1’s ineptness to now having to have surgery #2 to fix podiatrist #2’s ineptness.   And hormones–you need  a doctor that is invested in you and wants you to feel better not a doctor that just treats the symptoms (prescription) and then is out the door and on to the next patient.  I avoid, like the plague, male doctors age 40-60+ and never ever take what little nutritional advice any doctor tries to give. Med school doesn’t offer courses in nutrition.

I guess the point I am trying to make is fully invest yourself in you. If you aren’t into self-help books and if anything medical intimidates you ask a friend how they feel about their physician. Listen closely as they describe their doctor/patient relationship (doctor listens/helps/family doctor vs. doesn’t listen to me/just prescribes pills)– and if that doesn’t work seek out a naturopathic physician.

As this time I’ll add in the disclaimer that I don’t try everything I read or see online. Even though Suzanne Somers speaks highly about the use of bioidentical hormones, I’ve never used them. I’ve handled my menopause through change in diet and lifestyle. I’ve used certain foods to help balance hot flashes, moods, and sleepless nights.  What Suzanne Somers has inspired me to do is think outside the box. Not necessarily follow her regimen, or prescribe to her lifestyle, but rather positively become an advocate for my own health and try things even if they are not supported by the rest of the universe. I was the first person I knew eating organic. Local grocery stores now sell it–but it took them until 2012 to gain enough customers in this area to make it financially viable to stock. It never ceases to amaze me that as time has gone by many well known clinics and hospitals, as well as researchers and therapists, have released “new” information, treatments, and therapies long ago discussed in one of Suzanne’s books. Thank you Suzanne Somers for starting conversations about wellness, and women’s issues, and empowerment at a time no one else was discussing them.

My husband and I have saved thousands and thousands of dollars over the last twenty years eating better and living a healthier lifestyle. Personally I wasn’t blessed with good health and hereditarily my chances for getting anything from cancer to alzheimer’s to heart disease were pretty big. So I had to do something that would better my odds.

At the end of the day do you. Take care of you and take care of your loved ones and do whatever you need to do to be fully informed on your health, your care, your wellness, and your life.

Permaculture

You’ve probably been hearing a lot about permaculture lately, and like I, wondered what on earth is all the buzz about? Initially, I’ll be honest –all I saw when I looked at the word was culture, and I immediately thought it was a new group to join.

So what does permaculture really mean? Permaculture is defined as an agricultural system or method that seeks to integrate human activity with natural surroundings.

So how do we integrate human activity with natural surroundings?

Whether on your homestead, property, or in your garden everything created- food scraps, plant waste, and animal waste is all put back into the soil, hence composting, creating a closed loop system of farming/gardening. Nothing is brought in from the outside–you use everything that is already available to you from the resources you have on hand. Thus creating zero waste.

In essence, you collect waste, you compost the waste, and then you return it to your soil. In your soil, you grow your food, and if you have livestock you grow their food too.

By doing things this way your operation is considered sustainable, as well as efficient, less costly to operate, it’s environmentally safe, as well as safer for you, your family, and anyone that eats what you produce–nothing from the outside is being hauled in that may be contaminated with chemicals, bacteria, or other pollutants.

In closed-loop farming, you try to use everything such as:

  • Table scraps are composted- all scraps even bones and meat scraps.
  • Lard is rendered from pigs
  • Animal hides are tanned and turned into gloves, vest, jackets, and so much more.
  • Garden scraps–any and all safe plant scraps
  • Animal waste is composted.

By the way, this isn’t something that is new in farming, gardening, or homesteading. I grew up this way in the 70s, and know many hundreds of people that grew up this same way too. I grew up on a farm, but even most of the city kids I knew had compost pails under the sink. All kitchen scraps were thrown in the garden, and/ or fed to the chickens and pigs. Chickens scratch the ground–they are natural compost tillers. I found a great article about this here.

What is vitally important to remember as you start your spring planting is — you need your soil to be at its very best. You need to start with soil that is alive, healthy, and thriving. Chemical-laden soil grows a chemical laden product. Depleted of its nutrients soil grows depleted of its nutrients product. Small scale or large scale you don’t need to rely on places outside your farm or homestead to provide you with nutritious resources for healthy soil. You have everything it takes to make it if you have kitchen scraps, plant and animal waste, time and space.

Here’s an article I found that teaches you all about composting.

Here’s an article about building healthy soil.

Here is a Composting 101 Guide.

Here’s a Permaculture Film.

Here’s some free online streaming of all things permaculture.

And last but never least here is a family that blogs about homesteading, permaculture, and gardens created by chicken tillers– The Rhodes Family on Youtube. You will love them and find a ton of useful information about permaculture and chicken gardens here.

A special thanks to the website Permaculture Research Institute for providing hours of rich and comprehensive information for me to consume on Permaculture.

Building a strong immune system–what’s in my medicine cabinet

Headache/Sinus Headache/Facial Migraines –Peppermint Essential Oil.

Pain-bone spur pain, arthritis pain, bursitis pain–Copaiba Essential Oil

Colds, Flu, Sinus Issues- 1 tsp elderberry syrup every 1-2 hours for 12 hours.

Mood- I diffuse Orange and sometimes Lemon Essential Oil

Menopause issues- I eat yams–roasted, pureed, anyway they taste good. Sometimes mixed with mashed potato and sometimes with applesauce. They help a lot with hot flashes.

Sleep- Lavender Essential Oils on bottoms of feet, and I take 320 mg of magnesium a day. Magnesium works great for constipation as well. I found a great article on using Magnesium supplements here.

Rollerball for applying oil–15 drops of lavender EO and fractionated coconut oil. Put the 15 drops of lavender EO in rollerball and then fill the rest of rollerball up with fractionated coconut oil. Shake before each use.

Stress- Frankincense Essential Oils on the bottom of feet.

Same recipe as Lavender Essential Oil recipe for sleep, but you use Frankincense not the lavender with fractionated coconut oil.

Sore achy muscles- we take Epsom salt baths several times a week. Epsom salt is great for relieving muscle aches and pain and also detoxifies your body.

Not everything I use to support mine and my husband’s health is an essential oil. For over 20 years I have incorporated healthy living and a healthy diet into our lives. It’s been many years since my husband or I were sick. I don’t say this lightly–it takes work and considerable money. Eating junk food, or an unhealthy diet and using OTC products is so much cheaper.

Our diet– I’ll start by saying 60% of our diet is organic. I know some people are going to say to themselves I’m a food snob or? But I’m really not. I’ve had Fibromyalgia most of my adult life–probably close to thirty years now. I spent four years researching diets, food, and food safety and discovered that it was possible to feel better and live the life I wanted to if I changed my diet. So I did. It hasn’t happened overnight. We are still working on several changes in our diet. All total we’ve been working on a complete 360 almost fourteen years.

We aren’t big meat eaters. Before I got married I had been a vegetarian for over ten years. Since being married I’ve been a vegetarian for another ten years. We eat red meat once a week. We eat poultry or fish twice a week, and the rest of the week is meatless. We don’t eat out more than 12 times a year. When we eat out we usually choose homemade food restaurants or a local pizza place. I can’t think of anything we eat that we overeat. I don’t use any cheese in my cooking, processed foods are out, and most of what we eat is fresh and usually locally grown. When we grocery shop we shop in the outside aisles for the most part. I don’t buy anything in cans, boxes, or the freezer section except ice-cream.

We don’t drink alcohol and neither of us smokes. We also don’t use any OTC medications except Tylenol.

We weren’t always this healthy I assure you. Twenty-some years ago we had a cold every year, sometimes twice a year, just like everyone else. We also had the stomach flu a time or two. But overall I think we’ve been fairly lucky, considering I worked for almost twenty years in healthcare.

Having fibromyalgia has been the hardest thing for me because so many other things have come with it. I’ve dealt with IBS off and on since I was a teenager, but since changing our diet most of my IBS symptoms are gone. I’ve also had IC for about twenty years and that can be a very frustrating thing to have. But again diet plays a major part in controlling the symptoms of IC.

Before I quit smoking I had a lot of allergies. I probably had a severe allergy, that caused me to miss work, or be in bed all weekend, 3x a week. Now, I maybe have a couple of bad allergy days a year. Sometimes I have facial migraines, which are something new to me. I started getting these about ten years ago. I also deal with jaw pain at times which is also something found in people who suffer from fibromyalgia.

Another important thing for me to add in about my health is that I suffered from malnutrition most of my young life. I was diagnosed at eight years old. Growing up not only was I a picky eater, I had major issues regarding food. From a baby until eight or nine my diet was extremely limited. This aversion to food caused by malnutrition remained an issue until I was in my late thirties. To give you an example of the degree of malnutrition I had, I weighed 60 lbs in 5th grade. When I graduated high school I weighed 92 lbs. I tried twice in the eighties to join the military and twice weight issues prohibited me from being able to join.

To say my health was extremely fragile when I was 30, and met my husband and married, would be an understatement. I shouldn’t really be as healthy as I am now. I owe most of my good health to eating right and using a homeopathic approach to all of my health issues.

In addition to my homeopathic approach, I am also careful about getting the flu shot. I have never had a flu shot–I’m certain this statement will cause some readers to become very unhappy with me. But it’s true, no flu shot ever. I’m allergic to eggs and penicillin–and in the old days, you couldn’t get a flu shot if allergic to eggs (and I’m sticking with that recommendation, even though the CDC has now relaxed it). I still have issues with eggs if they’re not pasture raised organic eggs. In my whole life, I have had to use an antibiotic 3 times. Once in my childhood, once with strep throat, and once when I had foot surgery. That’s it. My husband has used an antibiotic just twice in his life, he too is allergic to penicillin.

Sometimes I am convinced being allergic to penicillin has been a good thing for both my husband and I. I once sat in a room with 15 students and our instructor and was the only student not to get the swine flu. My husband is 1 of 2 people out of a 100 people not to get the flu this year. It’s on its third time around in his workplace.

Three Secrets to a Strong Immune System

  • Probiotics- I eat Activia yogurts 3 x a week. I stop using them if I start to get too much gas or bathroom activity. That tells me I have enough active strains in my system and need no more at this time.
  • Sleep- 8 hours every night.
  • Drink 1/2 your body weight in clean filtered water every day.

I’d like to say we drink kombucha a lot or eat kimchi on a regular basis but we do not. We’ve tried both but unfortunately did not like them. Probiotics were difficult for both of us at first. I tried several brands of probiotic supplements and had varied results. If you’ve been reading my blog awhile you’ll remember I thanked taking Accuflora–a probiotic tablet for helping me to recover from a serious intolerance to gluten. I took Accuflora off and on for about two years with great success and then switched to Activia.

Other things that can be done to assure strong immunity and healthy living–

  • Wash bed pillow often or change it out.
  • Keep all toothbrushes separate from other toothbrushes and not out in open in your bathroom. I keep mine on a piece of paper towel in my medicine cabinet. Change out toothbrushes every 2-3 months, more if you’ve been sick. Change out the piece of paper towel or cup in is kept in every 2-3 days for the cup, once a week for paper towels.
  • Wipe down doorknobs if there is someone that has been sick in the home. Wipe down toilet flusher on toilet daily with a baby wipe or antibacterial soap.
  • Clean toilets once a week, more if someone has been sick in the home.
  • A banana or apple a day really does keep the doctor away.
  • Wash hands often. Don’t touch your hands to your mouth when out shopping in stores. Try not to touch bunker railings (where the meat etc. are kept in the meat and dairy department). Every time I’m at Walmart I see someone sneeze and wipe their hands all along the bunkers in the meat and dairy department.  My husband and I do use hand sanitizer all the time. We have heard that is really doesn’t work, but for us, it works even if it is semi somewhat pyschologically. Maybe it’s because that is what is on our hands vs. germs from the meat bunkers in Walmart? No clue.

I understand that not everyone can follow a homeopathic approach to their health. Many people have very serious issues that do indeed require regular doctor visits and prescribed medication. Other than my having Fibromyalgia and back issues my husband and I do not have health conditions that warrant being under a doctor’s care. Believe me when I tell you we do not take our good health for granted. At any time, for many reasons, our story could change. If you have some of the less serious issues I have mentioned I would encourage you to give essential oils, good herbal teas, and probiotics a try. I hope this post is helpful to some of you. I wish everyone good health in 2018!

If you are curious about oils or have any questions feel free to leave them in the comments. This month I am offering a $25.00 Amazon gift card to anyone that signs up for a wholesale membership with Doterra under my referral id–  4104948

To start an account and become a wholesale member (wholesale prices 25% off retail pricing) go here.

Choose language and country of residence and click continue and fill out account information. When you get to Account Type choose Wholesale Customer and when you get to Referral Information enter my referral id–4104948

Click Continue

There are two ways to get a wholesale membership account with Doterra–

  1. Pay $35.00 and then begin purchasing oils through your virtual office and get up to 25% off with each purchase.
  2. or Choose a starter kit (150.00 and up), waive the $35.00 membership fee and enjoy 25% off with each purchase.  I joined in 2017 with the Family Essentials and Beadlets Kit ($150.00). Best $150.00 I ever spent.

There are two ways to order your oils once you are a wholesale member–

  1. Create a New One Time Order
  2. Create a Loyalty Rewards Order (earn points, and get free product)

There are no requirements that you share or sell Doterra essential oils. But I promise once you learn how to use them and see just how they work you won’t be able to stay quiet for long. Even so, you can sit back and enjoy your oils and never have to sell them to anyone. Every year renew your wholesale membership –$25.00 annually and reap the rewards of these wonderful oils.

I have almost thirty years of using oils under my belt, and just a little over a year using Doterra essential oils. If you have any questions, any at all, feel free to leave a comment or email me at runjumpbegin@gmail.com

Thank you!