Tomato Tortellini Soup

I’ve needed this soup lately. This fall has been a bit trying. We live in an area that up until six months ago was fairly quiet. Suddenly construction started around us everywhere. There has been construction on the interstate that starts up at midnight and goes on until we get up. While I realize this is the only time some of these repairs can get done– we get no sleep during these times.  Most of the construction has involved machinery that digs down deep into the cement, tears it up, chews it up, and then a truck backs up (beep, beep, beep) and collects it. Then during the day, there is construction from 6am until 6pm right across the street. On the weekends the property manager for us has been trying to have the driveway and parking lot fixed, so you guessed it over a month now of construction right outside our door. My husband sleeps right through it, me not so much. Six months of this and I’ve reached my limit. Here’s hoping for finished construction projects and long cool nights of sleep in my future.

Here’s the recipe for the Tomato Tortellini Soup 

There is nothing better after a long day of work on little sleep than a good hearty tomato soup. You will love the Tomato Tortellini, it’s easy to make and yummy.

This month has been busy already with processing squash to eat this winter, visiting nearby lavender farms, zoos, even a corn maze, and of course visiting local apple orchards and buying lots, and lots of apples for eating and applesauce.

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I hope your fall is going great!

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Sacrificing– a way (and means) to better health

Every winter both my husband and I get asked at least a dozen times why we don’t get colds or flu. We just don’t. This past winter was my 11th year of good health–no cold and no flu at all. Do I get sick? Well, I do have days where my allergies kick my butt. Currently, we live near an area filled with ragweed and I am deathly allergic to ragweed. For years I thought it was all the goldenrod growing around here, turns out goldenrod is innocent. In fact, ragweed is the big culprit and I guess purposely grows near goldenrod to confuse allergy sufferers. The plants look distinctly different, but you may not find much on the internet about goldenrod’s innocence. Believe me, if you see goldenrod, ragweed is close by and it’s the one causing you to suffer. I use a lot of cold compresses and drink warm teas to help with them. My husband takes Claritin, but still suffers allergy symptoms. The ragweed is out of control I tell you. There are also a lot of trees around this area and trees (birch & cottonwood) and grass gives me sinus headaches. I was diagnosed with facial migraines in 2004 which can be associated with sinus issues. I’ve probably had these for almost twenty years now.  So yes, I’m not a perfectly healthy person by any means. That said I do everything in my power to increase my odds to live a life of good health.

In 2003 I went through a pretty intense period in my life. I lost a job I really loved that put me on a path that I’m still on to this day. First off I quit drinking for the second time, and I stopped smoking after smoking for almost 25 years. I did both cold turkey within 6 months of one another. I also quit drinking soda pop. My only beverage was water– good water (Evian).

Around 2004 I began to experience some weird symptoms hot feet, urinary problems, sore muscles and extreme fatigue. I had always had back and muscle problems from working in healthcare and injuring both my back, shoulders, and neck numerous times. First I went to my physician who ran a bunch of tests, some for hormones and basically gave me a clean bill of health. Second I was referred to a urologist for my urinary issue. After eating a good amount of strawberries summer of 2004 I noticed I was urinating scant amounts of blood and having to urinate multiple times a day. When I told the urologist this he informed me what I had would go away on its own, not to worry, and dismissed me. Turns out after some investigation what I have is interstitial cystitis–ulcers on my bladder lining. There is no cure. So depending on what I eat and drink, my bladder will act up. Over the years I have had flares that last a week or two at a time but then subside. Everything I eat can affect this issue. There is a special diet to follow, but I do not follow it. I do however drink a lot of water and have found that the flares last fewer and fewer days each time.

As for my muscle problems and extreme fatigue and sore painful points on my body issue– It was finally discovered by a different doctor that I have Fibromyalgia and have had it for quite a long time. Maybe close to 35 years? Fibromyalgia has a whole host of symptoms and I’ve run the gamut on each and every one of them. At the time mine was discovered there weren’t any medications to be prescribed. I was told to rest more and eat a better diet and exercise regularly.  Again I felt modern medicine had dropped the ball.

So instead of just giving up and crawling into a hole, I decided to research and research and find ways to better health. There had to be something more than eating a better diet. My diet had improved, but I could still do more. I researched organic food, homegrown and local and once I’d read everything out there on the interwebs about it (not much out there in 2004) my husband and I started on a path to a changed lifestyle that has included on the way- eating organic, living a more sustainable, chemical free, low in sugar, low to no preservative life. Believe me when I tell you it hasn’t been easy. All throughout my blog, I have posted about how hard it was and still is to source organic food. We’ve spent a fortune, that by the way, we didn’t always have, to ensure once we started we didn’t have to stop just because sourcing it was inconvenient. Back in the day I called stores and had them send product down with their salesperson for me to pickup because the local grocery stores didn’t carry it. We’ve put a ton of miles on our only vehicle to drive to CSA pickups and Farmer’s markets in order to get good homegrown produce. We’ve even gone as far as buying a new refrigerator and freezer so that our produce stays fresher and so that I can preserve some for over winter. Most of the changes in our lifestyle were made when we had only one income, and I was going to school full-time.  Not easy to do. Here are some other things I changed in my life to keep the odds in my favor:

  • I stopped using store bought sanitary items and started purchasing Luna pads in 2004.  This is a great article  recently written that explains my logic. I love Luna pads and using them while still having a period in my 50’s is a blessing.
  • I stopped wearing all make-up in 2004. Even without make-up I’ve gone on interviews, traveled, and worked in upper management positions. I know this may be a step that most women cannot or will not take, but I truly believe no make-up is one of the reasons I have almost no wrinkles. I mean like I have 1-2 wrinkles and I’m almost 53. I use Oil of Olay on my face and wash my face with Dove soap and warm water. That’s it. People look genuinely shocked when I tell them I am in my 50’s. It isn’t genetics I promise you that. I owe it all to no make-up!
  • No eating out in almost 90% of the restaurants out there- I gave up Taco Bell, Taco John’s, Chinese take-out, Indian/Thai take-out, McDonald’s, Burger King, buffets, Applebees, Pizza Hut really everything except two places. We still stop at our favorite high-end place for every special occasion- home grown food, and Panera. We started this ban on no eating out in 2004, but it took until 2010 or so to stop altogether. We don’t miss it or crave it and we’re saving a lot of $.
  • We grocery shop on the outer aisles, for the most part, only entering the inner aisles for cereal and baking products. We don’t buy food kits, mixes or canned or jar sauces. We don’t buy toppings, or canned cheeses, or packaged processed food of any kind. I had to give up Mac and Cheese and Cheez Whiz and Lipton Noodle soup and so much more. My husband’s list is even longer, including most of the food we import from Holland. If the product has more than 5 ingredients we don’t buy it.
  • No chemicals- all of our cleaning supplies are homemade/natural- lemon, vinegar, and essential oils. No sprays or candles or plug-ins are allowed in our house. No laundry soaps that are scented or colored. No fabric softeners or other smelly floral or perfume smelling cleaners or detergents. None. I changed almost everything over to chemical free by 2010. We don’t use body sprays, or smelly lotions or chemical laden soaps. I buy Dove soap and we purchase homemade soaps from local homesteaders or our co-op.
  • Almost all our food comes from our local co-op, Whole Foods, or Woodman’s grocery.  At least 90% of what we buy goes directly into the refrigerator or freezer. We have two big shelving units in our house for baking goods-bulk. Other than that condiments and bulk rice and bulk pasta, peanut butter and honey are the only dry goods we have in our home. Pizza is homemade, cakes and pies are homemade, jam is homemade, sauces are homemade and we freeze a ton of fruits and vegetable for overwintering.
  • Last but never least we eat produce when its in season. When peaches are in season I eat a lot of peaches. Same with strawberries and pears and raspberries and melons. When tomatoes are a plenty I eat 1-2 tomatoes a day for weeks. Same with fresh lettuce, beans, and squash. Sweet corn doesn’t agree with me much anymore, unfortunately, it is hard to find Non-GMO and/or organic corn. I do eat a dozen or so pieces each summer for nostalgia sake. In fall we eat a lot of squash -acorn and zucchini and new potatoes and beets. Spring– kale, spinach, early carrots, and peas. We follow the simple guideline of eating according to the season’s harvest.

In 2008 when the swine flu was knocking everyone out around these parts I sat in a classroom surrounded by students each in a different phase of the swine flu. Even the instructor was sick as were members of his family. Eventually, the school closed for a few days to let people recover. I didn’t get sick.  Nothing. This kind of immunity really remains a mystery to me to this day. As does my ability to continue to hike, walk several miles while out on an excursion with my husband, even bike ride Wisconsin trails without issue. I work, I volunteer and do a lot of outside activities never calling into work, never getting what most people consider sick. My husband has gone almost twenty years at his work with no sick days. I know it’s not because we are genetically healthy people with strong immune systems. I can promise you very little about how healthy we are today is associated with our genetics.

I believe 100% it has to do with our lifestyle and while I know that some of the changes I’ve made or we’ve made are extreme they are worth every year we go without colds and flu, worth the fact we don’t have ER visits or stand in long lines at the pharmacy. We worry about everything going on with insurance — we pay about $1600 a year for the both of us (which is pretty good all things considered), yet we have rarely used our insurance. We have annual preventative care physicals, but short of that my husband saw a doctor for a minor issue 10 years ago and I had surgery on my feet- arthritis, ingrown nails and bone spurs twice after surgery. That’s been almost 3-4 years ago, otherwise for me nothing since 2004. It works for us this I know.   It goes without saying before making any changes to your lifestyle and diet please be sure to talk them over with your trusted family physician first.  Until next time- be well!

“The Greatest Wealth is Health”

Links :

Food preservatives that are bad for your health- article here

Candles and Sprays and clean air- article here

Dangers of eating Fast Food- article here

Hormonal disruptors in make-up- article here

Summer Meal Planning–7 day meal plan

Tired of having to pay subscription prices for a meal plan? or sign up for tips and tricks and end up inundated with spam emails? Here’s a 7-day meal plan without a catch–no hassles, no subs, and definitely no hidden costs. Summer time is a time where meal planning can get a little hectic. School’s out, and there’s vacation time to plan for and meals tend to be quick meals with little cleanup. Nowadays with all the meal plans available, some right to your front door, why choose to make meals yourself? In my case, for my family’s needs, it came down to saving money and eating local homegrown whole foods. Maybe you don’t have that option available to you, or you don’t have the time to make meals from prep to finish? If you cannot source local homegrown then use what you have–supermarket produce works fine. I’m a big fan of T & A produce and it’s sold in most grocery stores. We eat T & A’s romaine hearts, broccoli, and hydroponic butter lettuce.

Most of the meals in my 7-day meal plan can be prepped the night before. So when you have a little bit of free time, prep the next meal. Also when you cook up ground beef make extra and freeze the extra portion for another meal. I double most recipes and freeze the rest. We have at least 3 meals frozen on hand at any given time that we can grab if time is tight.

Monday-Grilled Hamburgers with Napa cabbage slaw and slowly roasted potato wedges. Prep time-20 minutes. Total cooking time 35-45 minutes depending on how done you want your burgers.

Tuesday– Sausage, red cabbage and roasted sweet potato. Prep time 25 minutes–total time is 1 hour (includes bake time).

Wednesday-Everything but the kitchen sink salad-lettuce, cucumbers, green onions, sliced beets (I use Nellie’s sliced pickled beets vs. fresh beets), avocado, leftover red cabbage slaw and sliced boiled egg with homemade salad dressing. Prep time is 10-15 minutes- chop everything up, boil egg (5 minutes) wash and rinse lettuce & green onions.  You can add cooked chicken, steak or even tuna from tuna packs to make this a heartier salad.

Thursday-Roasted veggie taco with creamy cilantro dressing–recipe here. Total time- 45 minutes.

Friday– Pork Roast in the slow cooker, carrots, and new red potatoes. Prep 10-15 minutes. Total cooking time depends on the size of roast (minimum 4 hours on a low setting) add new red potatoes which are smaller than reg. potatoes during the last 2 hours of slow cooking so that they won’t get mushy before the roast is done.

Saturday-Pulled pork over baked sweet potatoes.  Prep time 5-10 minutes, total cooking time 1 -1/2 hours at 350 degrees for medium-large sweet potatoes.

SundayTeriyaki Chicken and vegetable foil pack for the grill- prep time- 30 minutes..cook time is 1 hour or until chicken is done. **I love this site and you will find several more easy foil pack meals to make plus so many more delicious things to try.**

Recipes-

Homemade Salad Dressing– your best salad dressing ( I use Vegan dressing by Hellman’s), mix 1/4 cup dressing( per 2 people )with a 1/4 teaspoon of salt (or less or not at all) & a tablespoon of granulated sugar and a half cup of milk. Add more milk if you want your dressing thin instead of creamy.  The healthier the salad dressing is that you buy, the healthier your homemade dressing will be. Total time- 5 minutes

Napa Cabbage Slaw– buy a Napa cabbage in the produce department or farmer’s market or local grower that is light green in color. You will also need 2 carrots and ingredients for the homemade salad dressing. I grate the carrots, chop the slaw and mix together with my homemade salad dressing. Use a bit less milk with the dressing because you want the slaw to be able to top your burger! You can add salt and pepper to taste and for extra flavor toss in chopped scallions. Total time- 15 minutes.

Red Cabbage- I use a great recipe from Taste of Home found here.

~~Grocery List~~

Produce department/Farmer’s market/local grower

Napa Cabbage

Red Cabbage

Romaine Hearts Lettuce

Scallions

Green onions

Avocado

Cilantro

Sweet Potatoes

Baking Potatoes

New Red Potatoes

Carrots

Cucumbers

Red Onion

Tomatoes

Yellow & Red Peppers

Zucchini

Lemon

Lime

Meat Department

Pork Roast

Hamburger

Chicken Breast

Sausage

**how much meat you buy will depend on family size**

Dairy

1/2 gallon of milk or 1/2 and 1/2 for salad dressing

Eggs- at least 6 eggs

Butter

Sour Cream

Middle Aisles

Good salad dressing- I’ve used both Just Mayo and Hellman’s Vegan dressing

Hamburger buns

Brown Sugar, soy sauce, cooking rice, sesame oil, chili garlic sauce, 32 oz. chicken broth, ground ginger, olive oil, 15 oz black beans, and Nellie’s sliced pickled beets.

Flour tortillas

I think I’ve remembered to add everything you will need to create these 7 easy meals to the grocery list above. Some meals will work for Paleo diets or even a vegetarian diet. Some can even be made if you are camping. Most take less than 30 minutes prep and there is even a meal that can be made from yesterday’s leftovers.  We eat a lot of meals that are heavy in produce because this is the time of year produce costs the least.  I generally don’t make meals like this in the winter due to not being able to source real fresh produce.  So enjoy these meals now, enjoy the savings, and reap the benefits of these great whole food meals for the next seven days.

Kombucha

Kombucha Recipe

One of the most important things you can do for you and your family’s health is to improve your gut health. Most people are under the impression things like that take care of themselves. They don’t. They probably did take care of themselves fairly well many years back before our food contained large amounts of fertilizers, pesticides, GMO’s and preservatives. At one time most of the people in this country preserved their food. Most people’s diets contained several pickled and fermented foods. Pickles of all kinds, coleslaw, and sauerkraut were table staples.  These foodstuffs helped keep human guts balanced with the proper bacteria. Bacteria and enzymes in our gut help to break down our food.  The food we eat, once broken down, travels off to different parts of our body to nourish us. We need to stay well nourished to stay healthy.

My experience with gut problems began about thirteen years ago as I detoxed from years of smoking and not so smart eating habits. First came the transition to a healthier diet, then came transitioning to organic foods, and then came my intolerance to everything gluten.  After suffering for about 5 years with gluten issues I read an article about gut health. Before I get started let me show you where your gut is and what parts of your body make up your digestive system.

The gut, otherwise known as your digestive track,  has many components– it starts with your mouth and teeth and technically ends where your waste exits. The stomach is one of three parts of your gut that absorbs and digests food, with the small and large intestine being the other two parts that break down, digest, and absorb nutrients. The linings of our small and large intestines are the largest part of our immune system. Now, this was a big find for me. Not only did I not have a clue our immune system is in our gut, but I was simply blown away discovering the largest part of it is the mucosal lining of our intestines. Nutrients enter the blood stream, once broken down, from our small intestines. There are tiny villi all along our intestinal wall. These villi are how nutrients enter our bloodstream.  The intestinal wall is permeable to some extent so that these nutrients can pass through. In a normal, healthy gut the good stuff passes through and the bad stuff does not. But sometimes bad things start passing through, and sometimes the intestines become damaged and the lining develops holes allowing undigested food to pass through.

Learning all of this information made me wonder- was there a way I could heal my gut lining if in fact it was damaged or malfunctioning? So  I began reading about the gut lining and found that there were other people, just like me, experiencing issues with “out of the blue” food allergies and/ or intolerances who were using probiotics as a way to improve their overall gut health. Probiotics as we know help to maintain the good bacteria in our digestive tract. That good bacteria is part of a large ecosystem of bacterial flora that lives mainly in the large intestine.

Gut flora is the complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tracts of humans and other animals, including insects. The gut metagenome is the aggregate of all the genomes of gut microbiota. (Wikipedia)

So I made an appointment with our family physician and asked for his opinion on whether or not starting on a probiotic would be a good thing or bad. He didn’t see how taking one could hurt and so I began using a probiotic about two years ago. Of course, I should note before I forget– a steady diet of kombucha and other fermented food in your diet would alleviate your need(most likely) to have to depend on a store bought probiotic. A lot of my gluten intolerance issues went away about one year after I started using probiotics. I still have problems with food that contain a lot of additives, preservatives and maybe GMO’s? Corn still bothers me, as does soybeans and oats.  Although I check labels and watch what I eat, sometimes things are hidden or ? and I experience pain, pressure, a lot of bloating and usually diarrhea.

A lot of my gluten intolerance issues went away about one year after I started using probiotics. I still have problems with food that contain a lot of additives, preservatives and maybe GMO’s? Corn still bothers me, as does soybeans and oats.  Although I check labels and watch what I eat, sometimes things are hidden or ? and I experience pain, pressure, a lot of bloating and usually diarrhea. I currently take a probiotic daily, but I’ve also incorporated fermented foods and kombucha into my diet as well.

Other than those very rare occasions I am presently symptom-free from issues associated with gluten intolerance. I believe the probiotic healed my gut to some degree by restoring the healthy bacteria I needed to process and digest my food. Some of the ways you can contribute to having unhealthy gut flora — a diet high in sugar (which I had for years) and low in fiber (that too).  Chronic stress(yes!) and chronic use of NSAIDs (yes to that too). Also if you are a person that has a lot of infections and relies heavily on antibiotics (thank goodness I can say nope to this one) you are at risk for having an unhealthy gut.

http://www.loveyourgut.com/what-does-the-gut-do/the-digestive-system/

http://www.enzymestuff.com/conditionleakygut.htm

I hope you’ve enjoyed my post about Kombucha, probiotics and gut health as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it. Until next time–be well!

The Benefits of Taking a Nap

nap-time

The benefits are listed here.

I am big on naps for many reasons.  Naps feel good.  I wake from a nap fully ready to take on the world. I am a bit saner after a nap, less cranky and way more energetic. But not everyone likes taking a nap. Remember when your mother used to force you to go take a nap? I do. Until I became an avid bookwork nap taking was pure evil. Do you remember laying in bed as a child staring at the ceiling counting sheep restlessly until your mother let you know nap time was over? I remember that too. But now, well actually for about the last 20 years, I am a regular nap taker.  I often try to get my husband to lie down and nap, but it’s just not his thing. Something tells me he is more the fall asleep in the recliner during the 6 o’clock news kind of guy.  For my nap to be successful I first plan how long it will be and set my clock. I make sure everyone in my household knows I am going to lie down. I turn on my white noise machine, rub lavender over my face and on my pillow and down I go. Whether it’s a 30 minutes nap or two hours I feel like a million bucks when I get up from it.

I do have night time sleep problems, but I’ve had those for many many years. My taking a tap doesn’t make them any worse and sometimes my nap makes me tired enough later in the day to fall fast asleep at bedtime. Try it. Just go ahead and try it.  What are you waiting for? Sweet dreams~ 🙂

My journey to becoming a foodie!@

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Before I was introduced to all the wonderful chefs of Food Network back in 1999 there was Jamie Oliver–the Naked Chef. I admit that the first time I heard the title of his show on BBC I thought “I wonder if they’ll show it here on American TV seeing as how he is naked”.  Much to my surprise the title of his show was just that and not to be taken quite so literally. Previous to my love for American chefs, and American cooking I was also highly influenced, and still am, by these British chefs also- Nigella Lawson, Gordon Ramsay, and Delia Smith. Of course before Jamie there were the fabulous French chefs on PBS every afternoon at 4pm. Now those chefs have been in my life for many years starting with Julia Child (American chef) whom I still watch today (DVD collection). I love the cooking shows and documentaries on PBS – to this day PBS is still my favorite television station. Some of the very first blogs I read, way back in the late 90s, were foodie blogs. My favorite to this day, that I’ve followed for twelve years, is Sarah Cooks .

So to continue my journey’s beginning- my favorite cookbook of Jamie’s is Jamie at Home. My favorite recipe is Roasted Carrot and Avocado Salad. I love that Jamie was one of the first chefs to create and promote healthy recipes/living. At the same time I was watching Jamie’s show I was also watching the first of Martha Stewart’s cooking shows.

From Jamie, the Naked Chef and Martha Stewart’s food segment’s on the Martha Stewart Living shows in the early nineties to Ina Garten, Tyler Florence, Mario Batali and Paula Deen. I became utterly and completely smitten with Food Network and its cooking shows. Eventually, I began collecting cookbooks and instead of just watching the chefs cook or bake something– I began cooking or baking their dishes. From that came wanting to source the best ingredients and the beginnings of a love affair of ordering exotic ingredients or hard to find ingredients online. From that came my passion for building a beautifully stocked pantry and purchasing the best pots and pans and cooking gadgets available on the market. Finally all of it led to my ambition in 2004  to cook and bake with whole foods, whole food ingredients- which is were chef Alice Waters and documentarian Michael Pollan come in. From this ambition and life-changing way of living came this blog which started in 2008.

After having sourced most of our food from farmer’s markets for so many years, I eventually became quite interested in homesteading. Which is were following blogs like those listed under my I heart homesteading blogs come in to play. From my absolute love of farming, growing my own, and living a more sustainable life, has come the desire to buy land and grow my own food.

Relocating has been something we’ve talked about for quite some time. It was always going to be something we did by our retirements. Finally, the stars have all come into alignment and we’ve decided to return back to the country I was born and raised for some time in and buy a piece of land. I am still a citizen of that country so our relocating there is a lot easier for me (and my family) to do than it might be for others. Our plan is to purchase the land very soon and then start the moving process shortly after. We hope to be settled by this time next year.

I hope you have enjoyed my journey on becoming a foodie. Until next time–do your body a big favor and choose to eat good food!

It’s salad time again!

Spinach salad

It’s that time again when our go-to meals will be salad and soup, soup and sandwich and of course fresh veggies and fruits found at local vegetable stands. We are both ready to hit the Dane County Farmer’s Market again, the outdoor market started a couple of weeks ago. I don’t mind saying that it’s been quite a balancing act trying to tend to my starter plants- carrots, tomatoes, beets and lettuce along with full-time work (busy season beginning to wind down) and the last couple of weeks of school- heavy course work with a project winding down and exams to study for. Let me not forget spring volunteer activities, vet appointments on my day off and spring cleaning. Whew, I’m beat. Friends are planning a graduation party for me and I’m not allowed to bring anything, unless of course its my spinach salad. Which I’m happy to oblige. We eat a lot of spinach, we throw it in scrambled eggs, make several different types of salads with it, use it for spinach and strawberry smoothies and just about every soup and stew I make. The recipe for the spinach salad above, which I will be bringing to my grad party, is here. I feel I’m a bit behind posting to my blogs, so today a rare weekday off I am catching up on posting, instagram and some correspondence with my 3rd cousin regarding family history research we are both working on. I mentioned soup and I’m going to share a delicious recipe for Dutch Vermicelli soup. We eat a lot of it in this household. I first learned of this soup from my mother-in-law and I’ve grown to love it over the years. I skip eating the little meatballs (I use ground beef) but I do make them for my husband. It’s a soup he has been eating all his life.

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That’s about it for what’s been going on here. I hope everyone is enjoying the nice weather we’ve had the last couple of days. I bought a bunch of bedding plants-impatiens,  begonias, geraniums, and cosmos just to name a few that I’ve been having to bring in at night still. Soon though I will transfer them to bigger pots and it’ll be warm enough for them to stay outside all night.  This weekend we are going to our first ever Badger rowing event. The Wisconsin Badgers Men and Women teams will be rowing at Devil’s Lake this weekend. So excited! Until next time have a great rest of the week! Source

Invest in yourself-the food you eat

invest in yourself

The real reason behind starting this blog several years ago was to voice my concerns about food safety and to journal about my family’s shift to an organic diet.  The desire to eat more organic food really struck me after reading story after story about all the additives in processed food.

When my husband and I married we had two very different eating styles that came from two entirely different lifestyles. He from a family that ate a lot of sweets and fattening food (and are now paying for it), and I who had been out on my own for many years eating whatever I could afford.  My husband wasn’t about to sit down to a meal of tuna sandwiches or mac and cheese any more than I was going to sit down to bratwurst, mashed potatoes, and gravy.  So, I needed to come up with a compromise. Eventually, I created a menu that included all of the healthiest things from each other’s diets and then as the years went on began to substitute them with the organic versions.

In 2004, after researching organic food, we started purchasing from the Organic Valley (OV) product line. Organic Valley headquarters are located in LaFarge, WI not far from where we live.  We chose OV after reading about their products, their farmers, and their founder.  Some of the first products we tried, and have stayed with for 10 years now, are OV milk, butter, eggs, and cheese.  We stopped buying canned vegetables and fruits at the grocery store and instead purchase fresh or frozen. I also purchase large amounts of green beans, squash, peppers and strawberries to freeze for meals throughout the winter.

In 2005 I noticed, after losing 10#, that I felt better than I had in a long time. I had quit smoking and drinking in 2003, started eating organic food in 2004 and was riding bike and hiking again. The list of foods that we had given up by 2005 was pretty long- some processed foods, sugary cereals, canned goods of any kind, non- organic sauces and gravies and non-organic dairy.

My husband had given up chips, cookies and other sweets for bananas and nuts. For a few years, while the organic food movement was getting started, sourcing food was a major problem. In 2007 we signed up for a CSA outside the area driving a 100 miles round-trip for our veggies. Then the following year we found a local one. But by 2009 the local one decided it was too much work and we were without a CSA again.  Since the spring of 2011, we’ve been buying our fruits and veggies from a local vegetable stand. 

People always ask me, ” how can you afford it?” And I answer “how can we not? it’s a lot safer than eating food that contains chemicals and additives and all those mystery ingredients”.

Sticking to an organic diet can be expensive. My husband and I take a lot of flak for choosing this way of life.  Thankfully we have fairly strong arguments against non-organic diets including the fairly obvious evidence of our health and active lifestyle.  As the years have gone by we’ve dropped other things from our diet- processed cookies, cakes, and non-organic condiments. We don’t eat fast food anymore and just recently I gave up salt.

Ten days after I gave up salt I weighed myself and I had lost 10#. No joke. At the same time, I gave up salt I also gave up red meat. I realized that I used a lot of salt on red meat because I didn’t like the taste of it.

The last seven years have been a struggle, my blog didn’t always report that. It isn’t easy to make changes to one’s diet. Sometimes it is not easy to justify the extra or added expense. I’ve had to do a lot of creative budgeting to afford some of the new food choices we’ve made. It’s easy to afford McDonald’s and easier yet to buy a bunch of processed foods and microwave meals every day. There has never been a time I’ve regretted the changes we’ve made or giving up things we liked because they were bad for us. It’s great to be almost fifty years old and feel like I’m in my 30’s. It’s a dream to see the smile on my husband’s face when he sees the progress he had made and the good health benefits he reaps every day.