Happy Fall!

Just hours before the first day of fall I kept busy baking up squash to freeze for over winter and peeling and slicing apples for applesauce. Ragweed has been kicking my butt these past few days, and I didn’t really feel like doing anything. Yet, these things needed to be done today and so they were. Three pounds of Macintosh apples yielded just a cup and a half of homemade applesauce. Thank goodness we bought more this past weekend, although those are slowly being eaten each day. I heart Macintosh apples.

I also had four squash to bake which made five packages of baked squash- five sides for a meal. The total cost of the squash and apples was $12.00 (roughly 2 dollars a side).

img_3090 food-24
food-20 food-21 food-25

I’ve managed to find several great pumpkin recipes I will be sharing this week or next as well as a recipe for Apple Fritter bread. I love fall for many reasons, but the food of fall is number one for me. I love pumpkin and apples and squash and warm cider. The post I promised with pantry essentials is almost done. Until next time ~Happy Fall~ ! Get outside if you can and enjoy the last bits of great weather if you live in an area that will see snow before long. Yes, I said it lol. Right now areas all over Wisconsin and Minnesota are flooding, stay safe if you’re out in it.

Fall food goodness

The last of the local zucchini is available this week, so I made sure to grate a bunch and freeze for pasta dishes this winter. Local apple orchards are announcing new varieties of apples every week. The first week we tried some new varieties and this week we bought Macintosh, Honey Crisp and Ginger Golds. Pears were plentiful too and ripened nicely next to our apples and bananas on the counter. A tomato plant I bought late at Bauer’s Market in La Crescent Mn. still producing. All total for a $9.00 plant, sold towards the end of planting season, it produced 17 tomatoes for me. To save seeds from tomatoes you cut the tomato in half and squeeze its pulp out into a small dish or container and cover for three days. The pulp ferments, allowing the covering that the seeds are encapsulated in to disintegrate. Each day you must stir the pulp and on day four rinse the pulpy seeds in a sieve careful not to allow seeds to sift through sieve (just the pulp) and then place on a piece of dry paper towel. As the seeds dry on the paper towel remove them from clumps to separate and allow to dry. You should store these dried seeds in a cool dry place, even the refrigerator- do not freeze them.  Coming up in future posts- seed saving, freezing vegetables, pumpkin recipes and pantry staples. Until then be well and always remember to eat good food!

food-1 food-2 food-4food-5food-3   food-6 food-7 food-8

Freezing Roma Tomatoes for Sauce

I’ve found throughout time that Roma tomatoes are the best tomatoes to make pasta sauce out of. I didn’t always know that. During late summer and early fall Roma tomatoes are plentiful. Around here one can buy a bushel for just a few dollars. The first step is cutting a shallow x in the bottom of each tomato and placing several tomatoes at a time (don’t overfill pot) in boiling water to blanch for 4 minutes. Then with a slotted spoon remove tomatoes and place in a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. Once cooled remove skins and core and place in a freezer bag, date it and into the freezer they go. Every time you desire fresh pasta sauce you remove your tomatoes from the freezer and make your sauce and its like a fresh cup of summer in every serving. My favorite pasta sauce recipe is here .

Enjoy!

tom-1 tom-2 tom-3 tom-4 tom-5 tom-6 tom-7

Freezer Creamed Corn

sweet corn

Summer food is beginning to make its appearance around these parts of Wisconsin. Locally the first of the sweet corn became available as well as this year’s first strawberries. From this time throughout the summer, we will buy both and enjoy them as they only get sweeter as the summer sun shines upon them each day. We’ve enjoyed asparagus and rhubarb lately and I’ve frozen both for later on. With strawberries, we either buy them at the farmer’s market or my husband and I go pick them at a local u-pick field. I freeze some, eat some, and make refrigerator jam out of the rest. With sweet corn, because of my allergies, I must eat corn in moderation. Although I would just love to sit down, as I once did, and eat 10 ears of corn at one sitting (sigh). I am pleased to announce though that my wheat and corn intolerance has gotten much better since I began taking a daily probiotic. Since around last fall, I’ve actually been able to return to eating most food products containing both wheat and corn without issue. We picked up 10 ears to try and if they’re good (sometimes the really early stuff is not) I’ll go back for more. We eat it and make salads with it and freeze it. I make freezer creamed corn, that I learned how to make almost thirty years ago now, and we enjoy it all winter long.

Here’s the recipe-

20 c. raw corn
1 lb. butter
1 pt. half and half
Salt to taste
1 tbsp. sugar

Mix all ingredients. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Cool, put in containers and freeze.

I also make a fresh cucumber, tomato and corn salad that goes great with shrimp. I use equal parts corn, chopped tomatoes and cucumbers mix them all together and drizzle a bit of Italian dressing over it. I also use this salad as the bed for my delicious grilled shrimp. Try it, you’ll love it.

By now my husband and I are a few days into our Door County stay, tossing the frisbee around, dipping our toes in the water and enjoying this view

door county lake view